ISCHE 2016 - Chicago | Ressources numériques en histoire de l'éducation

ISCHE 2016 - Chicago


ISCHE Chicago August 18-19, 2016


Eckhardt Fuchs, Rita Hofstetter, Solenn Huitric & Emmanuelle Picard


Panels Concept of the SWG Presentations made in Chicago Conclusion


General Introduction to the SWG sessions

Eckhardt Fuchs, Rita Hofstetter, Solenn Huitric

PANEL 1: Investigating discipline matters, by collecting and publishing of data on doctoral dissertations

Chair and discussant: Thérèse Hamel & Solenn Huitric
1. Recent Production Balance in the Field of History of School Subjects: The example of Doctoral Theses (Portugal, 2005-2014)
Carlos Beato & Joaquim Pintassilgo (Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal)
2. Doctoral Thesis in History of Education: Spanish Balance (2000-2010)
Carmen Sanchidrián Blanco (Universidad de Málaga, Spain)
3. Visualizing the History of Education Research Field through Doctoral Thesis: Depiction Options
Solenn Huitric (ENS de Lyon/LARHRA, France)
4. “Should I stay or should I go?” New Researchers in the field of History of Education
Susanne Spieker (University of Hamburg, Germany), Ian Grosvenor (University of Birmingham, United Kingdom), Angelo Van Gorp (Ghent University, Belgium)

PANEL 2: History of Education in specific Journals and Contexts

Chair and discussant: Rebecca Rogers & Eckhardt Fuchs
1. Annual publications on the history of education in Latvia. (1990 to 2015)
Iveta Kestere (University of Latvia)
2. The History of Education Journals: Reflections on a disciplinary field ? The example of two journals in Brazil and in Canada: the Revista Brasileira de História da Educação (RBHE) and Revue d’Histoire de l’éducation/Historical Studies in Education
Thérèse Hamel, Université Laval (Quebec)/Marisa Bittar (Universidade Federal de São Carlos/Brazil)
3. Clio’s Presence, or where is History of Education to be found?
Jean-Pierre V. M. Hérubel (Purdue University, IN, USA)

ROUNDTABLE: The internationalization of History of Education Journals and the external peer review process

Chair and discussant: Antonella Cagnolati (University of Foggia, Italy) & José Luis Hernández Huerta (University of Valladolid, Spain)
1. Helen Proctor (University of Sydney, Australia), History of Education Review (Australia)
2. Sara González Gómez (University of Islas Baleares, Spain), Patricia Quiroga Uceda (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain), Espacio, Tiempo y Educación (Spain)
3. Roberto Sani (University of Macerata, Italy), Luigiaurelio Pomante (University of Macerata, Italy), History of Education and Children’s Literature (Italy)
4. Rosa Bruno-Jofré (Queen’s University, Canada), Jon Igelmo Zaldívar (University of Deusto, Spain), Carlos Martínez Valle (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain), Ina Ghita (Queen’s University, Canada), Encounters in Theory and History of Education (Canada)
5. Nancy Beadie (University of Washington, USA), History of Education Quarterly (USA)
6. Diana Elvira Soto Arango (Pedagogic and Tecnologic of Colombia University), José Pascual Mora (Táchira University. Venezuela) Martha Corbert (Ministery of Education Jamaica), History of Latin American Education Journal

Conclusion and Perspectives Eckhardt Fuchs, Rita Hofstetter, Solenn Huitric

Synthesis and agenda for future collective work, symposium : Ische 2018 (Buenos Aire), 2019 (Berlin)
First collective publication : Mapping the discipline History of Education. Networks and Journals. Presentation of the concept and discussion

CONCEPT & ABSTRACTS

Standing Working Group Mapping the Discipline History of Education

CONCEPT

(see: http://rhe.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr/?q=mapping - previously : http://kartografy.wordpress.com/about/)

In the context of the growth, complexification and internationalization of higher education and research, it had seemed to be fruitful to map the history of education in Europe since the early nineties. Our goal is to create a current and retrospective assessment of the discipline’s institutional grounding and of the knowledge produced by its practitioners, stretching across national and cultural borders. Ultimately, the program will help to increase interactions among scholars and facilitate the creation of collaborative research agendas, thereby augmenting the standing and visibility of the discipline. It aims to describe the recent evolution of History of Education in order to make it more visible and, in knowing it and in reflecting on it, to reinforce its foundation and legitimacy. It may also serve as reference for prospective planning and for establishing a research agenda.

This mapping will focus on the emblematic traits that characterize any discipline: its institutional foundation (Institutes, departments, posts), communication networks (associations, scientific events, means for publication), the structures of socialization and education of the new generation (curriculum, diploma, doctoral theses) and the ongoing renewing of knowledge produced by the discipline (research, epistemological foundation, research methods). Transcending internal debates and defying boundaries of all types, our research program seeks to further the self-reflexive study of the discipline through the creation of collectively built databases. Via a shared virtual platform, such databases will provide common access to a catalogue of researchers and institutions, media outlets and studies on the history of education, irrespective of their institutional and geographic moorings. Collective discussion of the data and analyses produced will contribute to create synergies between historians of education in order to elaborate a common research agenda and to reinforce the base of the discipline.

PANEL 1: Investigating discipline matters, by collecting and publishing of data on doctoral dissertations

Chair and discussant: Thérèse Hamel & Solenn Huitric

This panel aims to pursue the work of the Standing Working Group on doctoral dissertations, understood as indicators of the construction of a field. Various sets of data have been collected in different countries and tools of analysis have been discussed during ISCHE 36 and 37. While improving the comparison between countries by welcoming new research, ISCHE 38 will also be an opportunity to submit visualizations of the different database.

1. Recent Production Balance in the Field of History of School Subjects: The example of Doctoral Theses (Portugal, 2005-2014) Carlos Beato & Joaquim Pintassilgo (Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal)

Presentation shown in Chicago accessible here

This paper is continuing the work presented at 2014 and 2015 conferences, where we have made an overall production balance regarding PhD theses presented between 2005 and 2014 that can be included in the field of History of Education, having the Portuguese context as reference. These complemented a previous work, authored by Jorge Ramos do Ó, where identical balance was made for the 1990-2004 period. We now add the year 2015, intending to deepen the previous analysis, taking as an example one of the fields present in a set of important theses developed within the aforementioned period and which has particular interest to us – the History of School Subjects. In the 2015 balance this was the second field in which most theses fit, 28 in a set of 83 theses, following the History of Educational Institutions (with 32 theses) and preceding the History of Educational Actors (with 25 theses). The History of School Subjects, which is strongly articulated with History of Curriculum, is a consolidated field within historical and educational research, which involves a solid theoretical foundation, where authors like Chervel, Goodson, Kliebard, Chevallard, Popkewitz, among others, can be included; it also involves a diversified and stable set of sources, and a particular research tradition regarding methodological procedures and conceptual tools. These recent researches show greater presence of subjects that were less studied in the initial stage, such as Artistic Education, area that encompasses the higher number of theses (6 to be exact), and Natural and Physical Sciences (with 5 theses). Mathematics maintains some relevance (also with 5 theses), as well as History (with 4 theses), although it is no longer the most studied subject, contrary to the initial phase. Regarding theoretical framework, the main novelty is a strong presence of Foucault’s inspired approaches, specifically in Artistic Education and Physical Education, something that was not so apparent in initial researches, albeit a remarkable theoretical hybridism remains. The relation with other fields of History of Education, and others, has also been explored, namely regarding the History of Educational Actors (Teachers, Schoolbooks’ authors, Students), the History of School Materiality (for example, the subjects’ didactic objects) or the History of Science. The process of enlarging the study sources continued to be deepened, leading to the inclusion of, for example, parietal frames or students’ works. In one of the cases, the articulation between two curricular subjects, within the same investigation, was also explored. In a field that has reached a certain degree of stability, and that could have some risk of stagnation, essentially we will try to identify its challenges, the approaches seeking its renewal, and the trends for future research, assuming the specificity, but also the exemplary, which this particular field contains within the research in History of Education.

2. Doctoral Thesis in History of Education: Spanish Balance (2000-2010)
Carmen Sanchidrián Blanco (Universidad de Málaga)

Presentation shown in Chicago accessible here

The analysis of doctoral thesis conducted in a scientific field is one of the pillars for the status of the field and this has been raised within the project Mapping the Discipline History of Education. With this work we intent to broaden and deepen our previous studies in the field of Doctoral thesis in History of Education. We have already presented some results about Doctoral thesis focused in one particular subject (History of Education in Franco’s times) in 2013, and Doctoral thesis registered in the Spanish database for dissertations, TESEO, in 2000, 2005 and 2010 in 2016. Starting from the works already presented about the thesis in France, Switzerland, Portugal and Italy, the aim of that article was to study the thesis included in TESEO which have among their descriptors “History of education”. We have analyzed variables such as national or local character, the study period and the duration.
In ISCHE 38 (Chicago 2016), we intend to analyze the Doctoral thesis presented in Spanish universities during a decade but focusing neither on a particular subject nor on a database. Thus the main differences with our earlier researches are the criteria: On the one hand, we are going to decide if a doctoral thesis belongs or not to our field, and on the other hand we are not going to use only a database but we will try to find the Doctoral thesis in any base, repository or source. The doctoral thesis must satisfy two criteria:
1) The subject of the dissertation clearly has a historical component. The Portuguese team (Joaquim Pintassilgo and Carlos Beato) has already clarify that it means that thesis must “took time as a central vector, and furthermore (…) [follow] the historical research “protocol”, defining a given time interval, resorting to sources of various nature, setting something different in the historian’s work, and following rigorous procedures, which are the hallmark of the job” (ISCHE 37).
2) The dissertation’s research question has an educational theme, understanding this concept in a broad and multidimensional sense.
Both criteria are relevant because, as we have shown in our previous research, there are doctoral thesis that have “History of Education” as a descriptor and that do not satisfy them.
At this stage of our study, we will focus in 2000, 2005 and 2010, but we intend to add the intermediate years and to expand the frame because the aim is to study the doctoral thesis in History of Education defended in Spain since 1990. Following the guidelines suggested by those responsible for this SWG, we assume that comparison should be the aim of this project. Therefore, we intend to collect data in the standardized format, using the grid that it will be in a short time in the web site of the project.

3. Visualizing the History of Education Research Field through Doctoral Thesis: Depiction Options
Solenn Huitric (ENS de Lyon/LARHRA)

Since 2014, our research group has been collecting data on French doctoral thesis on history of education from 1990 to today (ongoing thesis are included). Our database embrace around 500 doctoral dissertations, indicating the titel, the author, the advisor, the university where the dissertation was/is prepared and key words. Through the Standing Working Group, with other researchers and data from different countries, we have defined nine thematic groups that can be used both to classify these theses and to elaborate a comparison between countries (pedagogical issues, general history of youth, history of school curriculum and teaching methods, apprenticeship and vocational teaching, institutional history of education, school personnel, school life, social history of education, cultural transfers). The study of these categories reveals that certain subjects, periods and geographical areas are more likely to be studied during a doctoral work.
From these conclusions, another aspect has yet to be analysed. It strengthens on two dimensions: by whom and where those doctoral subjects are designed, and how they affect the field of history of education. Since one of the aim of the Standing Working Group is to develop tools to help visualize the construction of the field history of education, I aim to show that depicting the results of our database through networks visualization and maps can help us understand the institutional logics in this specific field. My purpose is, thus, to underline effects of specific institutions in the definition of a doctoral subject. Furthermore, I wish to initiate a reflection on how those visualizations can be transferred to a set of data from another country and on the possibilities we may have at our disposal to build lasting tools.

4. “Should I stay or should I go?” New Researchers in the field of History of Education
Susanne Spieker (University of Hamburg, Germany), Ian Grosvenor (University of Birmingham, United Kingdom), Angelo Van Gorp (Ghent University, Belgium)

The History of Education Doctoral Summer School started as an initiative of the European Educational Research Association’s Network 17: Histories of Education. It is funded by both the Stichting Paedagogica Historica and the History of Education Society (UK), and supported by the European Educational Research Association and the International Standing Conference for the History of Education. Since 2010 it has traveled from Ghent to Birmingham (2011), Lisbon (2012), Hamburg (2013), Umeå (2014), and Luxemburg (2015). From there it will move to Groningen (2016), Sassari (Sardinia) (2017), and Riga (2018). About 180 participants, mainly doctoral students but also some post-docs, joined so far, presented their doctoral research projects, and enjoyed discussions about content, methodology, and publishing with known members of the field. While some national organisations have local networks supporting new researchers with an own Seasonal School, e.g. the Sektion Historische Bildungsforschung of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Erziehungswissenschaft, the aim of this summer school is to support research cooperation and networking by connecting junior and senior researchers on a more transnational (initially, European) scale. This Summer School can be regarded as a structure in the ‘socialisation’ of new researchers in the field.
The paper looks at both participants and tutors. Where did they all come from? What were their institutional backgrounds and scientific biographies? Which topics where presented as PhD projects? What workshops were created and which information did tutors regard helpful for future historians of education? Starting from this basic information, which is known from the diverse conference materials, the paper also wants to shed light on where the participants went from there and to what extent participation in this Seasonal School might have had an effect on it or have contributed to it. Which were the international conferences they attended in the following years? Did they, e.g., go to either ISCHE or ECER? Did they stay in the field? Where do they work now? Did the Summer School they might have attended years ago help them to connect in Europe and beyond?

PANEL 2: History of Education in specific Journals and Contexts

Chair and discussant: Rebecca Rogers & Eckhardt Fuchs

1. Annual publications on the history of education in Latvia. The changing status of history of education in Hungary (1990 to 2015)
Iveta Kestere (University of Latvia, Hungary)

Latvia is a country that has an active and well-organized, but numerically small community of historians of education. Therefore, it is not possible to compare the number of publications, including periodicals, with those of larger European nations.
Latvia also lacks a tradition of periodicals in the history of education, because such journals were not published in the Soviet Union – the Baltic States were a part of the Soviet Union until 1991. However, it must be noted that the main Soviet academic pedagogical journal Sovetskaja pedagogika [Soviet Education], which was published in Russian, always included a rubric devoted the history of education.
Yet, since the renewal of Latvian independence, two regular publications devoted to research on the history of education have been founded.
The first is a collection of articles in Zinātņu vēsture un muzejniecība [History of the Sciences and Museology], published since 1999 by the University of Latvia as part of its research series. This publication features studies about the history of the University of Latvia completed by professors, doctoral students, and museum researchers – mostly biographies of notable Latvian professors.
Since 2000, the series Laikmets un personība [Epoch and Personalities], has been published by RaKa, which specializes in textbook publishing. This series, edited by a University of Latvia professors, has published research by PhDs and doctoral and master’s students devoted to notable pedagogues in the Baltic States.
Both publications have an editorial board, articles are reviewed, and the article collections are published annually. The language of publications is mainly Latvian but summaries in English are provided.
My goal is to highlight the international perspective of these publications, i.e. determine the nature of international literature used by Latvian researchers. This study will also help reveal the theories used by Latvian historians of education in their research.

2. The History of Education Journals: Reflections on a disciplinary field ? The example of two journals in Brazil and in Canada: the Revista Brasileira de História da Educação (RBHE) and Revue d’Histoire de l’éducation/Historical Studies in Education
Thérèse Hamel, Université Laval (Quebec)/Marisa Bittar (Universidade Federal de São Carlos/Brazil)

Scientific journals are becoming increasingly important in the scientific life of the researchers of education but also in the teaching of this discipline. In Brazil, the teaching of the history of education is very present at masters and doctoral degrees while in Canada, and in the case of Quebec, this subject area tends to loose ground, and even at the undergraduate level. Despite this narrowing at teaching, scientific journals in this field have an obvious longevity and represent living places of scientific production. It is therefore interesting to study these journals which are extremely important places of dissemination of scientific knowledge by researchers of this field.
This communication aims to present preliminary results of a study on two scientific journals in this field ,the Revista Brasileira de História da Educação (RBHE) and Revue d’histoire de l’éducation/Historical Studies in Education (RHE/HSE), both official journals of Scientific Societies in the area of History of Education (in Brazil and in Canada). It is somehow the continuity of the work begun last year and presented at the Standing Work Group on Cartography in Istanbul.
These two journals have different production time, since they were not founded in the same year, so we will briefly present some elements related to their history and then focus on the period: 2001-2014. We then will comparatively analyze the composition of the editorial committees and editorial boards; the authors of the articles, their gender, their geographical origin; their disciplinary origins; the international component (or not) of the articles and also of the authors.
As the corpus studied came from two countries with some very different characteristics, but both journals join the international scientific community whose rules tend to be more and more similar, we will present in conclusion the elements of analysis and reflection on preliminary comparison exercise we have done.
This first portrait will serve as a foundation for, in a further step, analyzing in depth the nature of products text, the favorite themes, the authors cited, the main theoretical references etc.

3. Clio’s Presence, or where is History of Education to be found?
Jean-Pierre V. M. Hérubel (Purdue University, IN, USA)

Presentation shown in Chicago accessible here

Historical research and scholarship demands specialization, nowhere is this more true than in the array of academic journals devoted to disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. The history profession is well served with its many specialized journals, focusing on diverse fields of interest. History of education too has its official organs for scholarly dissemination. A core of published scholarship can be found in Paedagogica Historica, History of Education Quarterly, History of Education, Histoire de l’éducation, or Historical Studies in Education / Revue d'histoire de l'éducation among others. Often these publication venues are tied to respective academic societies focusing on history of education. Yet, history of education may be found in disciplinary and subdisciplinary journals not readily identified with history of education. Therefore, this discussion will examine the constellation of journals publishing history of education within the context of disciplinary and historical specialisation. Discussion will focus on the years 1990-2014 in the journal literature, including which disciplinary configurations have published history of education topics. Major and minor journal producers of history of education will complement discussion of history of education as a distinctive field of historical scholarship within the contextualization of the larger history profession. Disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and/or multidisciplinary perspectives will further frame the discussion. Our research goals are to analyze and compare the current situation in post-socialist countries, thereby expanding the boundaries of research in the history of education by making more visible that part of Europe that had, up until recently, been hidden behind the Iron Curtain.
Currently, we have compiled information on History of Education courses in the Baltic States, Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia and Montenegro. We have data on course titles, education level (bachelor, master, doctoral), credit points, language of instruction, syllabus and instructors. We plan to supplement both the list of countries researched, as well as information sources (such as education programs).
The data researched to date reveal the inclusion of the history of education as an aspect of cultural history, which can be seen in the titles assigned to the courses, with a few exceptions in the history of childhood and adult education history. The history of education is primarily taught in bachelor level programs, less frequently in master level programs, and only a few countries include it at the doctoral level. Most of the staff teaching the history of education are professors. Current practice raises several issues about the history of education as a field of study – both learning and teaching. Most notably, how effective (or non-effective) is the consecutive nature of this field of study, and which criteria should be fulfilled in order to teach the history of education in universities.

ROUNDTABLE : The internationalization of History of Education Journals and the external peer review process

Chair and discussant: Antonella Cagnolati (University of Foggia, Italy) & José Luis Hernández Huerta (University of Valladolid, Spain)

1. Helen Proctor (University of Sydney, Australia), History of Education Review (Australia)
2. Sara González Gómez (University of Islas Baleares, Spain), Patricia Quiroga Uceda (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain), Espacio, Tiempo y Educación (Spain)
3. Roberto Sani (University of Macerata, Italy), Luigiaurelio Pomante (University of Macerata, Italy), History of Education and Children’s Literature (Italy)
4. Rosa Bruno-Jofré (Queen’s University, Canada), Jon Igelmo Zaldívar (University of Deusto, Spain), Carlos Martínez Valle (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain), Ina Ghita (Queen’s University, Canada), Encounters in Theory and History of Education (Canada)
5. Nancy Beadie (University of Washington, USA), History of Education Quarterly (USA)
6. Diana Elvira Soto Arango (Pedagogic and Tecnologic of Colombia University), José Pascual Mora (Táchira University. Venezuela) Martha Corbert (Ministery of Education Jamaica), History of Latin American Education Journal

The management of scientific journals is a complex, demanding business. Among their numerous tasks, editorial teams must clearly define their mission, raise awareness of its originality, increase the international scope of the publication, achieve accreditation for good editorial quality, get included in one or more ranking schemes, and adhere to best practice guidelines.
However thorough, adoption of these guidelines means that all internal databases and repertoires must be correctly indexed, various methods of product promotion and distribution must be adopted, a competent, open and independent editorial board must be on hand – not to mention a large, robust international scientific committee of experts. The journal must be published regularly, punctually, and according to certain formal standards, and the editorial team must oversee the external review process, protecting the anonymity of both authors and reviewers, and guarantee the importance, originality and scientific rigor of the articles published.
The external review process is a key component of ensuring the scientific reliability of a journal, as the quality of the research published will depend, in large part, on the work carried out by the expert reviewers. There are several potential review models to choose from, but authors tend to prefer the double-blind approach. Indeed, the reviewers’ comments and suggestions enable the authors to improve their initial submissions to such an extent that many feel it is worth sending a paper to a specialized journal, regardless of whether or not it is eventually published, in order to obtain reliable feedback as to its quality.
However, the review process itself is controversial, and plagued with potential pitfalls, not least of which the occasional delays in receiving reports from the reviewers, the quality of such, the potential bias they may themselves bring to the process, and the lack of transparency in the method itself. It also represents a challenge for the editorial team, who must ensure the availability of a wide network of collaborators with the appropriate expertise and rigour of approach. This is no mean feat, as no payment is involved, and the journal must therefore count on the altruism of reviewers willing to dedicate their own time and energy to improving its quality. It is also firmly dependent on establishing effective lines of communication between the editorial team and the authors/reviewers. This takes on a whole new dimension when the journal becomes international, accepting submissions in several languages, or when on the verge of doing so. Not only do the logistics of communication and publishing become more complicated, but, as the geopolitical basin of the authors expands, so too does the range and scope of topics they cover.
In real terms, this means that hundreds of e-mails will need to be sent, and, in many cases, much research must be done to find the right reviewers to willingly undertake such a delicate job, which is, however, largely overlooked by accreditation agencies.
An effective means of supervising the review process is a priority concern for practical reasons, as it affects the visibility, publication, and citation index of a journal. Researchers are more apt to consult and seek publication in specialized journals with a high impact factor. Indeed, the highest ranked journals are rightly considered to be at the forefront of scientific progress, although on reflection there would appear to be a risk of this ‘positive feedback loop’ generating a kind of scientific endogamy.
Another issue to consider in the process of reviewing original works is the so-called “editor’s cut”. Although this selection process undoubtedly saves time and energy when restricted to rejecting articles that do not conform to clearly stated editorial guidelines or areas of interest, the waters can be muddied when the editors take it upon themselves to discard articles on grounds of research quality, for example. Although some editorial screening is undoubtedly expedient, this practice clearly goes against at least one of the founding milestone of the review process, namely the anonymity of author and reviewer. Another way of looking at the issue is as follows: is it possible to practice the “editor’s cut” while still adhering to a double-blind review process – the minimum standard required by best practice guidelines?
The agenda for this roundtable is to debate:
● the current challenges faced by the editorial management of scientific journals;
● the pros, cons and potential of the various management models for the external review of scientific papers;
● how effective communication with authors and reviewers might best be achieved;
● the “editor’s cut” under the microscope;
● how journals could collaborate to create an optimal model for review process management.

***

Conclusion and Perspectives

Eckhardt Fuchs, Rita Hofstetter, Solenn Huitric

Synthesis and agenda for future collective work, symposium : Ische 2017 (Buenos Aire), 2018 (Berlin)
First collective publication : Mapping the discipline History of Education. Networks and Journals. Presentation of the concept and discussion.


Pour citer cette ressource : Rita Hofstetter, Solenn Huitric, Emmanuelle Picard, «SWG Mapping the Discipline History of Education, ISCHE 2016 (Chicago)», septembre 2016 [en ligne] http://rhe.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr/?q=mapping-chicago (consulté le 24 Septembre 2017)
Auteur : Solenn Huitric
Droits d'auteur : Creative Commons by-nc-sa 3.0 FR